What wetsuit should I buy for swimming?

What kind of wetsuit is best for swimming?

For general purpose water play, consider an entry-level wetsuit made of Standard Neoprene -or- 30% Stretch Neoprene. If you are swimming laps occasionally, a stretchier suit will be less restricting. Look for a 30-60-or 100% stretch suit depending on your budget. Basically, the stretchier the better!

What thickness wetsuit is best for swimming?

Instead, we recommend that you swim with us in a ‘normal’ or ‘surfing’ style wetsuit that has material on both sides. They are much more durable, at least 3-5mm in thickness, and often warmer when swimming at slower speeds, rather than training.

Can you swim in a normal wetsuit?

Well, the easy answer is, yes, of course you can. But, it might not be as simple as getting just any wetsuit. Picking the right wetsuit for the job is important. It’s important to know that different wetsuits are intended for different purposes, including swimming, surfing, waterskiing, and other water sports.

Can you swim in a 7mm wetsuit?

Measured in millimeters, the thicker the wetsuit is, the colder temperatures it allows you to handle. A 7mm suit can withstand temperatures around 38 degrees. Have a suit that is less than 2mm, and you can only go into water around 70 degrees or better.

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Can you swim in a 3mm wetsuit?

The rules state a wetsuit is made of material providing thermal insulation, shall completely cover torso, back, shoulders and knees. They shall not extend past neck, wrists and ankles. They should be between 3mm and 5mm thickness but can be lower in some parts of the suit to allow free movement.

Is 5mm wetsuit too thick?

We recommend a wetsuit thickness of at least 5mm; we recommend wearing boots, but hood and gloves are optional depending on your tolerance to the cold.

Is 3mm wetsuit OK for winter?

Thickness. The most obvious difference is a thicker wetsuit will keep you warmer, as thicker neoprene means more tiny bubbles trapping in air to insulate you. … So for a winter wetsuit you’ll be looking for a 4/3mm or more, and for summer opt for just 2 or 3mm of neoprene.

Can you surf in a swimming wetsuit?

While surfers need a wetsuit with built-in flexibility to swim (just like us triathletes), they also spend a lot of time bobbing about, waiting for that stellar wave. So, surfing wetsuits are usually thicker than triathlon wetsuits on average – when you take into consideration torso, back, shoulders, arms and legs.

How do I choose a wetsuit?

How Should A Wetsuit Fit? A wetsuit should fit like a second skin with no sagging in the back or excessive bunching in the arms or legs. It should fit tight in order to keep only a thin layer of water between your body and your suit.

Do you need a wetsuit for cold water swimming?

There are of course exceptions, but swimming for long enough without a wetsuit to maintain fitness in typical UK winter water temperatures would be dangerous and irresponsible. … But if you had any notion of staying fit through winter swimming, you will have to abandon them with your wetsuit.

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How cold is too cold for a wetsuit?

The range of 50 to 78 degrees is therefore the ideal range for using a wetsuit. Any warmer, and the swimmer may actually overheat due to the wetsuit’s insulative qualities.

What wetsuit do I need UK?

Season / Water Temperature

Water Temperature Wetsuit Type Wetsuit Thickness
20°C – 25°C Shorty 1mm to 1/2mm
15°C – 20°C Shorty or Full Length Suit 1/2mm or 3/2mm
10°C – 15°C Full Length Suit 3/2mm or 5/4/3mm
Below 10°C Full Length Suit 5/4/3mm

How warm is a 2mm wetsuit?

Surfing wetsuit temperature guide & chart

Water temperature in °C/°F Wetsuit Thickness
22 – 24 °C 71,6 – 75,2 °F 1 – 2mm neoprene top
19 – 22 °C 66,2 – 75,2 °F 2mm shorty or springsuit
17 – 20 °C 62,6 – 68 °F 2 mm fullsuit, Long John or Jane
13 – 18 °C 55,4 – 64,4 °F 2 mm or 3/2 mm fullsuit